mizoguchi:

Pedro Costa - State of the World (x)

I think this whole video is great but this particular section really caught my eye and really speaks to how Costa undermines the auteur label. It’s clear that he wants to show his own vision but one that is alignment with the subjects he films. It’s almost a ‘(largely) by the people, with the people, for the people’ mentality that takes into account the realities and truths of the impoverished, marginalized communities he films in Portugal. What Costa expresses above is very important because most white westerner filmmakers tend to view cinematic creation ultimately at their hands and can be molded how they want no matter what the cost to the subjects and communities and groups affected by such depictions. 

I interpret the beginning of the excerpt of him creating the initial vision but in a bare outline and is largely controlled by the people who are in the film. The closest most known director who does the same is Jorge Sanjinés. In my opinion, Costa’s the only contemporary well-known white European filmmaker aside from Claire Denis who can actually make honest depictions of marginalized communities. And what I mean by that term is the colonized and descendants of the colonized (such as immigrants who come to Europe). In the case of Costa, he depicts immigrants from Cape Verde, which is a former colony of Portugal as well as inhabitants of Cape Verde like in Casa de Lava

Honestly..kind of shame that he does so few films? But it’s also kind of great because every time he releases a new film every 5+ years it’s a masterpiece in so many ways.

(via filmantidote)

I’ve desperately want to see Short Term 12 and just discovered it’s on Netflix Instant.

However I was about to go to bed…

This is the worst decision ever

Maybe I should use it as an incentive to do my work

sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 

Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick

These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 

I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.

This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 

These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 

chescaleigh:

I didn’t think it was possible, but my respect level for Denzel just went up about 100 times. Not every job is worth accepting.

So now that we’ve all gotten to see the first clip of “Girl Meets World” can we agree that it’s going to suck?
Like it might be good Disney tween show wise but as a spin-off it’s going to suck.
Current Disney is not the right format for a “Boy Meets World” spinoff. Their current shows don’t have the same depth as shows from the BMW era. It’s not going to be as mature.

So many people are going to be extremely disappointed when it premieres.  

avantblargh:

ahundredemeraldcities:

Léa Seydoux in Prada Candy by Wes Anderson.

AND ROMAN COPPOLA

geekbap:

note-a-bear:

mermaidheartsongs:

absolutezeronow:

danapolis:

stabra:

after hearing about it through the submission to @angryasiangirlsunited, i checked out the trailer of Lucy and am even more disgusted. and so not surprised. whiteness is getting too old.

the upcoming movie lucy will feature the age-old racist narrative of pure white woman (scarlet johansson) being violated by scary, brown men. and the new white feminist trope of women gaining their power by violently eliminating brown men. who needs the white male savior when we now have white female saviors, taking it into their own hands to save their whiteness from all that non-whiteness. so radical.

My favorite part are the white feminists who are raving about this movie because “strong independent woman yaaaas!!”

i’m just wondering why there are herbs and fruits and vegetables written in a faded, creepy red on a prison-like wall in chinese.  are herbs and fruits and vegetables in chinese supposed to be part of some sort of scare tactics?  or am i missing something here?

HAHAHAHAHA

The above makes this so much better

OMG THIS MOVIE IS BULLSHIT OF THE HIGHEST ORDER THEY COULDN’T EVEN BOTHER TO GET SOMEONE TO WRITE ACCURATE SHIT IN CHINESE ON THE WALL THEY PROBABLY GOOGLED A TAKE-OUT MENU OR SOMETHING THIS IS WHAT A $20MIL BUDGET BUYS IN HOLLYWHITE EVERYONE! 

(via 2brwngrls)

theacademy:

36 films where Billie Holiday is on the soundtrack
Fritz The Cat (1972) An Unmarried Woman (1978)Promises in the Dark (1979)The Thing (1982)Nine 1/2 Weeks (1986)Satisfaction (1988)Rocket Gibraltar (1988)Torch Song Trilogy (1988)Slaves of New York (1989)Harlem Nights (1989)Enemies: A Love Story (1989)The Marrying Man (1991)Switch (1991)The Rocketeer (1991)Malcolm X (1992)Forever Young (1992)The Meteor Man (1993)Schindler’s List (1993)It Could Happen to You (1994)Corrina, Corrina (1994)Forget Paris (1995)Clueless (1995)Se7en (1995Stealing Beauty (1996)The Funeral (1996)Ulee’s Gold (1997)Celebrity (1998)The Green Mile (1999)Angela’s Ashes (1999)Minority Report (2002)Two Weeks Notice (2002)The Notebook (2004)Capote (2005)Watchmen (2009)Public Enemies (2009)42 (2013)

theacademy:

36 films where Billie Holiday is on the soundtrack

Fritz The Cat (1972) 
An Unmarried Woman (1978)
Promises in the Dark (1979)
The Thing (1982)
Nine 1/2 Weeks (1986)
Satisfaction (1988)
Rocket Gibraltar (1988)
Torch Song Trilogy (1988)
Slaves of New York (1989)
Harlem Nights (1989)
Enemies: A Love Story (1989)
The Marrying Man (1991)
Switch (1991)
The Rocketeer (1991)
Malcolm X (1992)
Forever Young (1992)
The Meteor Man (1993)
Schindler’s List (1993)
It Could Happen to You (1994)
Corrina, Corrina (1994)
Forget Paris (1995)
Clueless (1995)
Se7en (1995
Stealing Beauty (1996)
The Funeral (1996)
Ulee’s Gold (1997)
Celebrity (1998)
The Green Mile (1999)
Angela’s Ashes (1999)
Minority Report (2002)
Two Weeks Notice (2002)
The Notebook (2004)
Capote (2005)
Watchmen (2009)
Public Enemies (2009)
42 (2013)

Forever amazed that I know someone who legitimately believes the second Harry Potter movie is the best. 

We all know it’s the third. 

animdungeon:

lumierefactory:

I saw a documentary yesterday about Wonder Woman and the history of female superheroes in our cultural and it was so frustrating to watch. In one section they go on and on about how amazing the riot grrrl movement was and it completely ignores the racism that was a part of it. And they had Kathleen Hannah talking doing that part and she was bashing the Spice Girls and saying they weren’t real role models for girls which as a black girl pissed me off because unlike Bikini Kill they had a girl that looked like me, they weren’t part of a racist movement and they didn’t have racist lyrics. 

Read More

When people are fighting for better roles for women in film, they tend to forget the women who are really needing representation.

I am quite disappointed in this documentary for not including actors like Pam Grier - who not only the first WOC* actress in a starring role but also an action star which paved the way for actresses like Milla Jovonovich, Sigourney Weaver and Linda Hamilton, to rising stars like Zoe Saldana, and Danai Gurira from the Walking Dead.

If we want to have more representation of people in the media we consume, we have to look into ALL of them, not just the white, cis heterosexual demographic.

(*- American actress, making this note in comparison to Asian, African and Latin-American actresses who have their own film history)

Yes!!! This perfectly sums up my feelings about the film.